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Imitating with the mouth the fluid voices of birds
came long before
men were able to sing together in melody and please the ear. 


             Lucretius (94-55BC): De Rerum Natura

 

The idea for Singing the World arose from a series of conversations between painter Siu Carter, musician and composer Bennett Hogg, artist and printmaker Alex Charrington, natural history sound recordist Geoff Sample and myself about music, art and bird song.

 

Imitating with the mouth the fluid voices of birds
came long before
men were able to sing together in melody and please the ear. 


             Lucretius (94-55BC): De Rerum Natura

 

The idea for Singing the World arose from a series of conversations between painter Siu Carter, musician and composer Bennett Hogg, artist and printmaker Alex Charrington, natural history sound recordist Geoff Sample and myself about music, art and bird song.

 

Singing the World A Dawn Chorus at Cheeseburn

Although William and Dorothy Wordsworth lived a century apart from Bashō and in two very different cultures, it is, perhaps, surprising to find that there are a number of similarities between both their writing and the ideas that lay behind it. The Wordsworths and Bashō were innovators in their time.

Although William and Dorothy Wordsworth lived a century apart from Bashō and in two very different cultures, it is, perhaps, surprising to find that there are a number of similarities between both their writing and the ideas that lay behind it. The Wordsworths and Bashō were innovators in their time.

Walking Poets in Japan

As dusk falls you may be lucky enough to see bats, but you are unlikely to hear them as they emit a 'chirp', and listen to the echoes. From these echoes bats can build a rich 'picture' of the world about them. Bats emit sounds at a higher pitch than we can hear; sounds which can be picked up by a bat detector. These sounds can then be rendered digitally to produce a sonogram – a visual representation of sounds at dusk made by the bats – ultrasonic sounds the naked ear can’t hear.’

 

 

As dusk falls you may be lucky enough to see bats, but you are unlikely to hear them as they emit a 'chirp', and listen to the echoes. From these echoes bats can build a rich 'picture' of the world about them. Bats emit sounds at a higher pitch than we can hear; sounds which can be picked up by a bat detector. These sounds can then be rendered digitally to produce a sonogram – a visual representation of sounds at dusk made by the bats – ultrasonic sounds the naked ear can’t hear.’

 

 

Bats at Cheeseburn

This walk was organised as a part of the Community Media Applications and Participation programme (COMAPP). It began at 5.30 am outside the Media Centre on St. Peter's Campus. The reason for starting so early was to enable us to catch the dawn chorusFrom the Media Centre, we walked along the north bank of the River Wear, over the Queen Alexander Bridge, then along the south bank of the river, crossing the Wearmouth Bridge, finishing at the Glass Centre with breakfast in the pod.

This walk was organised as a part of the Community Media Applications and Participation programme (COMAPP). It began at 5.30 am outside the Media Centre on St. Peter's Campus. The reason for starting so early was to enable us to catch the dawn chorusFrom the Media Centre, we walked along the north bank of the River Wear, over the Queen Alexander Bridge, then along the south bank of the river, crossing the Wearmouth Bridge, finishing at the Glass Centre with breakfast in the pod.

Sound Walk

This circular walk with natural historian Keith Bowey started at the National Glass Centre in Sunderland at 7.30 am. It meandered along the banks of the River Wear, crossing the Wearmouth and Queen Alexandra Bridges before finishing at the National Glass Centre at 11.30am, celebrating the diversity of flora and fauna within our urban environment, linking it to the hidden histories of past social and industrial activity.

 

This circular walk with natural historian Keith Bowey started at the National Glass Centre in Sunderland at 7.30 am. It meandered along the banks of the River Wear, crossing the Wearmouth and Queen Alexandra Bridges before finishing at the National Glass Centre at 11.30am, celebrating the diversity of flora and fauna within our urban environment, linking it to the hidden histories of past social and industrial activity.

 

AV Festival

This work (Street Flowers - Urban Survivors of the Privileged Land)  was pasted onto a billboard near the Vaux Brewery Site in Sunderland as a part of CIVIC - the first International festival of billboard art organised by the Northern Gallery for Contemporary Art.

This work (Street Flowers - Urban Survivors of the Privileged Land)  was pasted onto a billboard near the Vaux Brewery Site in Sunderland as a part of CIVIC - the first International festival of billboard art organised by the Northern Gallery for Contemporary Art.

CIVIC

Two years ago, I undertook a guided walk from the mouth of the River Derwent (at the Metro Centre in Gateshead) to its source, high in North Pennines. The journey was led by an ornithologist (Steve Westerberg) and a natural historian (Tina Wiffen). About 15 people took part over a period of 4 days (every Saturday for four weekends). I learnt much about the landscape through which we walked and as a group we shared our ideas, thoughts and knowledge.

Two years ago, I undertook a guided walk from the mouth of the River Derwent (at the Metro Centre in Gateshead) to its source, high in North Pennines. The journey was led by an ornithologist (Steve Westerberg) and a natural historian (Tina Wiffen). About 15 people took part over a period of 4 days (every Saturday for four weekends). I learnt much about the landscape through which we walked and as a group we shared our ideas, thoughts and knowledge.

FIELD NOTES

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