Field Notes - Walk 3

Field Notes - Walk Day 3

Friday, May 27, 2011
Lemington Gut - Wylam: Natural Historians - Keith Bowey and Tina Wiffen

View VARC Walk 3; 28th May 2011 in a larger map

We started the walk at Lemington Gut, just beyond Scotswood Bridge. The River Tyne used to pass very close to Lemington, until the Tyne Improvements Committee cut a new, shorter, straighter channel over the Blaydon Haugh, leaving behind the Lemington Gut, where our walk began – so you could say that this walk actually began in the middle of the Tyne! From here followed the river for approx. 1.5 miles before swinging away as we approached Newburn. The route then ran along the Hadrian’s Wall Path for a short while, skirting Newburn itself until we reached Newburn Bridge. We crossed the Tyne here and our way next took us through Ryton Willows and Ryton Golf Course, keeping close to the river all the way to our journey’s end at the Boathouse in Wylam (an excellent inn, renowned throughout the region for its supply of fine ales!).

Day 3: 28th May; Lemington Gut - Wylam. Natural Historians - Keith Bowey and Tina Wiffen


We will started the walk at Lemington Gut, just beyond Scotswood Bridge. The River Tyne used to pass very close to Lemington, until the Tyne Improvements Committee cut a new, shorter, straighter channel over the Blaydon Haugh, leaving behind the Lemington Gut, where our walk began – so you could say that this walk actually began in the middle of the Tyne!  Lemington has a strong industrial history. It is famous for its brick glassworks cone built in 1787, and also visible from here are the ruins of the former Tyne Iron Company Ironworks which were built in 1797 and decommissioned in 1886. Its coke ovens are still evident near Lemington Power Station.

 

From here we followed the river for approx. 1.5 miles before swinging away as we approached Newburn. The route then ran along the Hadrian’s Wall Path for a short while, skirting Newburn itself until we reached Newburn Bridge. We crossed the Tyne here and our way next took us through Ryton Willows and Ryton Golf Course, keeping close to the river all the way to our journey’s end at the Boathouse in Wylam (an excellent inn, renowned throughout the region for its supply of fine ales!). There was a railway station in Wylam for transport home.

 

This walk is one of the most interesting ones, from a natural historians point of view, that we undertook with sightings of Ringed Plover and Little Ringed Plover, as well as Curlew and Oystercatcher. Amongst the many flowers and grasses we saw were Sea Aster, Birdsfoot Trefoil, Canary Reed Grass and Scurvy-grass. Around Ryton Willows we saw and heard Linnet, Yellowhammer, Reed Bunting, Garden Warbler, Whitethroat and Grasshopper Warbler, although this bird, (whose song has been likened to the sound of a fisherman’s fly reel!) is often most vocal in either the early morning or the late evening. Around Close House, north of the river, are found heavy metal deposits, some of which have found there way south of the river. Here we found the Narrow-lipped Helleborine.