AV Festival

AV Festival

Street Flowers: Urban Survivors

Street Flowers: Urban Survivors Sun 25 March 2012, 7.30am -11.30. A circular walk with natural historian Keith Bowey that meandered along the banks of the River Wear, celebrating the diversity of flora and fauna within our urban environment, linking it to the hidden histories of past social and industrial activity. To read more about this project click on more information and then scroll below the images.

This circular walk with natural historian Keith Bowey started at the National Glass Centre in Sunderland at 7.30 am. It meandered along the banks of the River Wear, crossing the Wearmouth and Queen Alexandra Bridges before finishing at the National Glass Centre at 11.30am, celebrating the diversity of flora and fauna within our urban environment, linking it to the hidden histories of past social and industrial activity.

 

My practice in recent years has straddled the performative and ephemeral (through the walk) and the permanent through the work I subsequently make in my studio and show in a gallery. This walk, (and the resulting work) is part of a series of projects I am developing called Street Flowers – Urban Survivors of the Privileged Land and takes place on the reclaimed banks of the River Wear - an area that just 60 years ago was the world’s busiest centre for shipbuilding. The first walk in this series took place on the 1st June 2011 and you can down load a pdf of the list of flora and fauna seen and heard during this short walk of just 3 miles (over 140 different species) by clicking on the file on the right hand side of this page.

 

Guided by the spirit of acclaimed nature writer Richard Mabey, the walk took the form of a slow meander, in order to properly experience the world. Its early morning focus highlighted  the sounds and smells of urban nature before the onslaught of traffic, listening to resident bird song including robin, song thrush, blackbird and dunnock.

 

One of the two art works below (with the light green background) is from the same walk I completed on 1st June 2011. A signed, limited edition print of this image was given away to participants  over breakfast in the Pod at the NGC when we chatted about the morning's walk over a bacon/veggie buttie, croissants, tea and coffee. For more information about this project please click on the box below (more information). The other print is a reworking of the diary I wrote after this walk.

 

Based on these walks I was invited to present a paper and talk, which was delivered first at the international conference, Duration, at Newcastle University from 29th – 31th March 2012 (see http://tinyurl.com/7r2p45s) and then expanded, presented and published at the International Conference, Tourism, Roads and Cultural Itineraries: Meaning, Memory and Development June 13 - 15, 2012, Québec, Canada.

This circular walk with natural historian Keith Bowey started at the National Glass Centre in Sunderland at 7.30 am. It meandered along the banks of the River Wear, crossing the Wearmouth and Queen Alexandra Bridges before finishing at the National Glass Centre at 11.30am, celebrating the diversity of flora and fauna within our urban environment, linking it to the hidden histories of past social and industrial activity.

 

My practice in recent years has straddled the performative and ephemeral (through the walk) and the permanent through the work I subsequently make in my studio and show in a gallery. This walk, (and the resulting work) is part of a series of projects I am developing called Street Flowers – Urban Survivors of the Privileged Land and takes place on the reclaimed banks of the River Wear - an area that just 60 years ago was the world’s busiest centre for shipbuilding. The first walk in this series took place on the 1st June 2011 and you can down load a pdf of the list of flora and fauna seen and heard during this short walk of just 3 miles (over 140 different species) by clicking on the file on the right hand side of this page.

 

Guided by the spirit of acclaimed nature writer Richard Mabey, the walk took the form of a slow meander, in order to properly experience the world. Its early morning focus highlighted  the sounds and smells of urban nature before the onslaught of traffic, listening to resident bird song including robin, song thrush, blackbird and dunnock.

 

One of the two art works below (with the light green background) is from the same walk I completed on 1st June 2011. A signed, limited edition print of this image was given away to participants  over breakfast in the Pod at the NGC when we chatted about the morning's walk over a bacon/veggie buttie, croissants, tea and coffee. For more information about this project please click on the box below (more information). The other print is a reworking of the diary I wrote after this walk.

 

Based on these walks I was invited to present a paper and talk, which was delivered first at the international conference, Duration, at Newcastle University from 29th – 31th March 2012 (see http://tinyurl.com/7r2p45s) and then expanded, presented and published at the International Conference, Tourism, Roads and Cultural Itineraries: Meaning, Memory and Development June 13 - 15, 2012, Québec, Canada.