Airshow cultural walks

Airshow cultural walks

Airshow cultural walks
Two walks along the banks of the River Wear
29 July 2011 to 4 September 2011

These two walks were supported by WALK and Sunderland City Council and took place as part of the Sunderland Air Show in 2012. For more details click on the more information button and scroll down below the images.

Street Flowers – Urban Survivors: Walk on Saturday 30th July

We met outside the Yacht Club near the North Pier at 10.00 am.  From the Yacht Club, we walked around the North Dock Basin and then up the steps to the Riverside Walk. From here, we went past the National Glass Centre, under the Wearmouth Bridge, and followed the River Wear past the Stadium of Light. We then crossed the Queen Alexander Bridge and dropped down onto Deptford Terrace on the South side of the River. From here, we walked past Alex Smiles' depot and onto the Riverside Walk (South). Our journey then continued under the Wearmouth Bridge again, ending opposite the National Glass Centre, just past the Fish Quay at around 16.30. The walk took approx. 6.5 hours. When I recced this walk in two sections in early June I walked the route between the two bridges with my colleague Keith Robson and encountered over 140 different species of flora and fauna! On Sunday 24thJuly, I walked the sections east of the Wearmouth Bridge (north and south) and, again, was surprised at the wealth of flora and fauna in this area.

 

Street Flowers – Urban Survivors: Walk on Sunday 31st July

This walk was a little different to the one advertised (as a result of the recce done on the 24th July). We met at 10.00am outside the Winter Gardens. From here, we walked through Mobray Park, exiting at Park Road. After 100 metres, we turned down the Esplanade and then walked along Ryhope Road for about 200 metres. Next, we turned into Backhouse Park, taking a detour along the (now dried up) stream that runs through it and then back to Ryhope Road, which we crossed. We now accessed Villette Road through Barley Mow Park, walking down to Corporation Road. A short way along Corporation Road we came to a little green oasis in the middle of Hendon – a local community garden, a large group of allotments and a series of pigeon coops.We next crossed over Commerical Road, through the subway under the railway line (now disused) and onto the coast. Now we could really stretch our legs! The final part of journey followed the coastal path from Hendon to Ryhope Dene where this walk finished at around 15.45.  Along this route, we encountered a wide variety of flora and fauna in quite different habitats from the streets around the City centre, though the parks and allotments to the coastal path – all within the space of 5/6 miles – and all within a stone's throw of the City Centre.

 

These two walks (click on the box below which says more information for details) were supported by WALK (Walking, Art, Landskip and Knowledge) - a research centre at the University of Sunderland - and Sunderland City Council

 

The walks are a part of a larger project I am currently working on, under the same title (Street Flowers, Urban Survivors of the Privileged Land) - a title inspired by the writing and philosophy of Richard Mabey, in particular his early books Street Flowers (published in 1976) and the Unofficial Countryside (1973) - a classic work recently re-published. His recent excellent (and very readable) book, Weeds, extends this examination. This book is described by the publisher as a cultural history of weeds - plants which are part of nature’s immune system, of its instinctive drive to green over the barrenness of broken soil and decaying cities.

 

However, my interest in Mabey's approach to the natural world extends beyond this. He has, over the years, written a host of books that identify the importance of plants in our everyday lives, and has shown how our cultural history is intimately linked to plants. He has also explored the links between art and science (between the stereotypical image of the scientist as a discreet observer and classifier of nature, and the artist as a creative interpreter of our experiences) – especially in his latest book, The Perfumier and the Stinkhorn

 

For more information about The Perfumier and the Stinkhorn, and the issues Mabey discusses in relation to the work I am trying to do, please see the two entries for the 5th May in my blog (first one - The Perfumier and the Stinkhorn and the second one 'These are interesting questions') 

 

FOR MORE INFORMATION ABOUT THESE TWO WALKS, PLEASE CLICK ON THE 'MORE INFORMATION' BUTTON BELOW

Street Flowers – Urban Survivors: Walk on Saturday 30th July

We met outside the Yacht Club near the North Pier at 10.00 am.  From the Yacht Club, we walked around the North Dock Basin and then up the steps to the Riverside Walk. From here, we went past the National Glass Centre, under the Wearmouth Bridge, and followed the River Wear past the Stadium of Light. We then crossed the Queen Alexander Bridge and dropped down onto Deptford Terrace on the South side of the River. From here, we walked past Alex Smiles' depot and onto the Riverside Walk (South). Our journey then continued under the Wearmouth Bridge again, ending opposite the National Glass Centre, just past the Fish Quay at around 16.30. The walk took approx. 6.5 hours. When I recced this walk in two sections in early June I walked the route between the two bridges with my colleague Keith Robson and encountered over 140 different species of flora and fauna! On Sunday 24thJuly, I walked the sections east of the Wearmouth Bridge (north and south) and, again, was surprised at the wealth of flora and fauna in this area.

 

Street Flowers – Urban Survivors: Walk on Sunday 31st July

This walk was a little different to the one advertised (as a result of the recce done on the 24th July). We met at 10.00am outside the Winter Gardens. From here, we walked through Mobray Park, exiting at Park Road. After 100 metres, we turned down the Esplanade and then walked along Ryhope Road for about 200 metres. Next, we turned into Backhouse Park, taking a detour along the (now dried up) stream that runs through it and then back to Ryhope Road, which we crossed. We now accessed Villette Road through Barley Mow Park, walking down to Corporation Road. A short way along Corporation Road we came to a little green oasis in the middle of Hendon – a local community garden, a large group of allotments and a series of pigeon coops.We next crossed over Commerical Road, through the subway under the railway line (now disused) and onto the coast. Now we could really stretch our legs! The final part of journey followed the coastal path from Hendon to Ryhope Dene where this walk finished at around 15.45.  Along this route, we encountered a wide variety of flora and fauna in quite different habitats from the streets around the City centre, though the parks and allotments to the coastal path – all within the space of 5/6 miles – and all within a stone's throw of the City Centre.

 

These two walks (click on the box below which says more information for details) were supported by WALK (Walking, Art, Landskip and Knowledge) - a research centre at the University of Sunderland - and Sunderland City Council

 

The walks are a part of a larger project I am currently working on, under the same title (Street Flowers, Urban Survivors of the Privileged Land) - a title inspired by the writing and philosophy of Richard Mabey, in particular his early books Street Flowers (published in 1976) and the Unofficial Countryside (1973) - a classic work recently re-published. His recent excellent (and very readable) book, Weeds, extends this examination. This book is described by the publisher as a cultural history of weeds - plants which are part of nature’s immune system, of its instinctive drive to green over the barrenness of broken soil and decaying cities.

 

However, my interest in Mabey's approach to the natural world extends beyond this. He has, over the years, written a host of books that identify the importance of plants in our everyday lives, and has shown how our cultural history is intimately linked to plants. He has also explored the links between art and science (between the stereotypical image of the scientist as a discreet observer and classifier of nature, and the artist as a creative interpreter of our experiences) – especially in his latest book, The Perfumier and the Stinkhorn

 

For more information about The Perfumier and the Stinkhorn, and the issues Mabey discusses in relation to the work I am trying to do, please see the two entries for the 5th May in my blog (first one - The Perfumier and the Stinkhorn and the second one 'These are interesting questions') 

 

FOR MORE INFORMATION ABOUT THESE TWO WALKS, PLEASE CLICK ON THE 'MORE INFORMATION' BUTTON BELOW