Harker Herald

Harker Herald

Harker Herald
August: Six Birds of the Coquet Valley, Northumberland
31 July 2008 to 31 August 2008

In 2008, I was commissioned to make a Billboard for the side of the Waygood studios in Byker, Newcastle. For this piece, I drew on the local, Northumbrian words for birds I had seen on walks in the Coquet Valley in Northumberland. W I T T O L: Wheatear; C H I T T Y: Meadow Pipit; Q U E E S T: Woodpigeon; C A L L O O: Curlew; 

K E E L I E: Kestrel; W I Z Z L E: Dipper

In 2008, I was commissioned to make a Billboard for the side of the Waygood studios in Byker, Newcastle. For this piece, I drew on the local, Northumbrian words for birds I had seen on walks in the Coquet Valley in Northumberland. Of course, Newcastle was once a part of the old kingdom of Northumbria, when the birds named here would, more than likely, have been seen on or around the Ouseburn that runs through Byker.

 

A study of bird names presents an ‘unpredictable and haphazard richness’ with names drawn from ‘the very roots of our language’ British Birds: Their Folklore, Names and Literature by Francesca Greenoak. The name Coquet comes from the Old English cocc, meaning ‘wild bird’.

 

W I T T O L   Wheatear   C H I T T Y   Meadow Pipit    Q U E E S T  Woodpigeon    C A L L O O   Curlew

K E E L I E   Kestrel   W I Z Z L E   Dipper

 

To concide with the showing of the billboard, I presented a small and related group of work in the gallery in Waygood called the Hanging Wall

In 2008, I was commissioned to make a Billboard for the side of the Waygood studios in Byker, Newcastle. For this piece, I drew on the local, Northumbrian words for birds I had seen on walks in the Coquet Valley in Northumberland. Of course, Newcastle was once a part of the old kingdom of Northumbria, when the birds named here would, more than likely, have been seen on or around the Ouseburn that runs through Byker.

 

A study of bird names presents an ‘unpredictable and haphazard richness’ with names drawn from ‘the very roots of our language’ British Birds: Their Folklore, Names and Literature by Francesca Greenoak. The name Coquet comes from the Old English cocc, meaning ‘wild bird’.

 

W I T T O L   Wheatear   C H I T T Y   Meadow Pipit    Q U E E S T  Woodpigeon    C A L L O O   Curlew

K E E L I E   Kestrel   W I Z Z L E   Dipper

 

To concide with the showing of the billboard, I presented a small and related group of work in the gallery in Waygood called the Hanging Wall