Ghosts of the Restless Shore

Ghosts of the Restless Shore

Ghosts of the Restless Shore
Space, place and Memory
22 August 2015 to 29 November 2015

Ghosts of the Restless Shore: Space, Place and Memory was an exhibition of new contemporary art by four artists (Tim Collier, Jake Campbell, Rob Strachan and myself) integrating visual, aural, historical and oral/written/textual experiences of the natural/social history of the Sefton Coast. For further information click more information and scroll down below the images.

From the mouth of the River Mersey to the Ribble estuary stretches England’s largest undeveloped dune system - the Sefton Coast.  

 

The Sefton Coast is a transitional point between the known and unknown, a place in between danger and safety, between every day settlement and wilderness, in which its natural cycles work as both an obscuring and revealing force. It is landscape alive with special wildlife and its coastal waters are 'home' to famous shipwrecks. 

 

'Ghosts of the Restless Shore: Space, Place and Memory' is an exhibition of new contemporary art by four artists (Tim Collier, Jake Campbell, Rob Strachan and myself) integrating visual, aural, historical and oral/written/textual experiences of the natural/social history of the Sefton Coast. The artists walked the Sefton Coastal Footpath together in the summer of 2014 (please click here for further information about this walk) and the work in the show is based around experiences of that walk as well as a sustained period of research in 2014/15 undertaken by the artists into the social and natural history of the coast (please click here for a link to the website Ghosts of the Restless Shore for more information abouit the project). 

 

All the work in the exhibition examines, in one form or another, the way we (as culturally and socially informed people) interact with the natural environment, not just in terms of the way in which the landscape is experienced, but also the way in which it is interpreted and imagined.

 

For this project, I have used local, colloquial, dialect names integrated into a series images. When I was a child, I used to walk with my brother, Tim, and my family, through these sand dunes and along the coast, and have incorporated illustrations and texts from historical family guide books about flora as well as drawing on, using, and displaying, specimens from the botanical archive of the flora of the coast held by the Botany Department at the World Museum, Liverpool.

From the mouth of the River Mersey to the Ribble estuary stretches England’s largest undeveloped dune system - the Sefton Coast.  

 

The Sefton Coast is a transitional point between the known and unknown, a place in between danger and safety, between every day settlement and wilderness, in which its natural cycles work as both an obscuring and revealing force. It is landscape alive with special wildlife and its coastal waters are 'home' to famous shipwrecks. 

 

'Ghosts of the Restless Shore: Space, Place and Memory' is an exhibition of new contemporary art by four artists (Tim Collier, Jake Campbell, Rob Strachan and myself) integrating visual, aural, historical and oral/written/textual experiences of the natural/social history of the Sefton Coast. The artists walked the Sefton Coastal Footpath together in the summer of 2014 (please click here for further information about this walk) and the work in the show is based around experiences of that walk as well as a sustained period of research in 2014/15 undertaken by the artists into the social and natural history of the coast (please click here for a link to the website Ghosts of the Restless Shore for more information abouit the project). 

 

All the work in the exhibition examines, in one form or another, the way we (as culturally and socially informed people) interact with the natural environment, not just in terms of the way in which the landscape is experienced, but also the way in which it is interpreted and imagined.

 

For this project, I have used local, colloquial, dialect names integrated into a series images. When I was a child, I used to walk with my brother, Tim, and my family, through these sand dunes and along the coast, and have incorporated illustrations and texts from historical family guide books about flora as well as drawing on, using, and displaying, specimens from the botanical archive of the flora of the coast held by the Botany Department at the World Museum, Liverpool.